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new patient charges

At 09:14 AM 10/29/98 -0600, you wrote:

>If you are covering for someone else's practice and see a patient for
>the first time, do you charge the new patient charge? Do you make up a
>new chart and have them do the usual intake forms? If you don't, then
>what do you do if the patient subsequently informs you that you are
>going to be their physician? Do you charge a new patient visit, then?
>Thanks, Kevin
>
>

When I see a patient on another provider's behalf, I treat and bill the
patient as if I *were* that provider. The patient shouldn't get penalized
financially because their provider had someone else covering. One ENT
office locally has one doctor who's part of Blue Cross and two who don't.
When a patient with Blue Cross see's the Blue Cross doc they have a $20.00
co-pay but if he's not in the office and one of his associates see's the
patient the family get's charged $100.00, Blue Cross pays an
out-of-network rate of about $20.00, and the patient gets a bill for
$80.00. I don't send Blue Cross patients to that practice anymore.

We have a "One Time Visit Form" which skips some of the usual new patient
information but is appropriate for an urgent care type of visit.

I don't accept new patients into my practice if they met me as a result of
my covering for another provider. There have been a couple of times when
the family made a follow-up appointment without explaining that they were
planning to switch practices or there was already a connection to my office
(a relative or friend who already was a patient in the practice, etc.). In
those cases I personally called the previous provider, explained the
situation, and in most cases they were happy to see the patient leave their
practice (and I later found out why).

Michael Sachs, M.D.
General Pediatrician

new patient charges

I think this is entirely in the hands of our third party payer. From an
ethical and legal point of view, I treat coverage patients like any one coming
into my practice. I take a complete HPI, do relevant past history and review
of systems, ask about current medications, drug allergies, and even family
history if it is relevant. To do less would be negligent. However, our third
party payers will not accept a new patient code if the kid's PCP is on my
coverage list. We generally keep the progress notes in a searate file, for
our convenience.

new patient charges

Message from Kramer, Kevin hidden@email-address

Presumably that means at least a 99214 in most cases, which means likely a greater
fee than the other doc would have charged. Do you ask the patient if they've
actually seen their physician yet? Some of them, particularly older kids might be
seeing you as the first encounter for their new insurance. I agree with those
who've commented about penalizing the patient to a degree, but the fact is that a
patient that hasn't been seen before takes more time than an established one.
Kevin

hidden@email-address wrote:

> I think this is entirely in the hands of our third party payer. From an
> ethical and legal point of view, I treat coverage patients like any one coming
> into my practice. I take a complete HPI, do relevant past history and review
> of systems, ask about current medications, drug allergies, and even family
> history if it is relevant. To do less would be negligent. However, our third
> party payers will not accept a new patient code if the kid's PCP is on my
> coverage list. We generally keep the progress notes in a searate file, for
> our convenience.